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Symposia

Intracellular ion channels and transporters
07/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Adam Szewczyk Adam Szewczyk (PL)
Warsaw
 Ildiko Szabo  Ildiko Szabo (IT)
Padova
Session will present the most interesting issues about functionalrole;regulation and pharmacology of the mitochondrial transporting proteinswithspecialfocuson ion channels. The primary function of the mitochondrial channels is regulation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Additionally, mitochondrial channels alter cellular respiration, regulation of the mitochondrial volume andreactive oxygen species(ROS)synthesis.Mitochondria play a fundamental role in ATP synthesis within majority of mammalian cells. Especially where there is high density of these organelles in such a tissue as cardiac muscle or brain. This canonical function of mitochondria is accompanied by its high metabolic activity and signaling role for example by (ROS). Mitochondria are the only cellular organelle with very high membrane potential (around 200 mV), due to respiratory chain activity, with negative polarization of mitochondrial interior (matrix). This property has a fundamental impact on role of cations and anions permeability through inner mitochondrial membrane on mitochondrial function. In other words,cell functioningis based onmitochondrialions permeability.
Signaling molecules
07/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Jolanta Jura Jolanta Jura (PL)
Krakow
 Wim Declercq  Wim Declercq (BE)
Gent
Within the organism, cellular signaling events direct appropriate responses to intracellular and extracellular triggers. They involve the transmission of specific signals starting from a receptor, either membrane-bound or intracellular, in order to develop temporary but specific responses to environmental changes. These responses are often propagated by signaling cascades based on (de)phosphorylation, (de)ubiquitinylation, proteolysis, etc, eventually leading to changes in gene expression, cell metabolism, proliferation, migration and cell survival. All these processes need tight regulation by signaling pathways because disruption in cell signaling results in different disorders as a cancer and inflammation. This session will cover several examples of such signaling cascades in health and disease.
RNA processing
07/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Magda Konarska Magda Konarska (PL)
Warsaw
Juan Valcarcel Juan Valcarcel (ES)
Barcelona
All classes of RNA transcripts undergo processing to reach mature forms. Nuclear RNA maturation events are tightly controlled and regulated, allowing the cell to properly respond to various developmental and environmental stimuli. In this session we will discuss mechanisms of RNA processing as well as the involvement of RNA maturation steps in the regulation of gene expression.
DNA variation
07/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Piotr Kozlowski Piotr Kozlowski (PL)
Poznan
Manfred Kayser Manfred Kayser (NL)
Rotterdam
Human genetic variation is shaped by evolutionary processes including natural selection, population effects including migration, and random effects such as genetic drift. This session will highlight how human genetic variation is used to address mostly non-medical questions regarding origin and history of human populations, evolutionary processes, demographic events, phenotypic traits, forensic applications etc., covering contemporary and ancient DNA studies.
Cardiovascular diseases
07/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Stefan Chlopicki Stefan Chlopicki (PL)
Krakow
Andreas Daiber Andreas Daiber (DE)
Mainz
Vascular endothelium is recognized as an autocrine/paracrine/endocrine multifunctional organ that regulates a number of important functions to maintain homeostasis of the cardiovascular system and to regulate inflammatory pathways. Impairment and/or derangement of endothelial function is involved in most, if not all, human diseases, in particular in cardiovascular diseases, and has not only pathophysiological but also diagnostic and therapeutic significance. This session will cover various aspects of endothelial biomedicine, such as mechanisms of vascular dysfunction induced by risk factors of atherosclerosis that have not been appreciated previously (aircraft noise), and novel approaches to profile endothelial function in vivo as well as to target therapies to endothelium.
RNA transcription
07/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
 Szymon Swiezewski  Szymon Swiezewski (PL)
Warsaw
 Jane Mellor  Jane Mellor (UK)
Oxford
Transcription is not only the first step in expression of a gene but also probably the most regulated one. The act of transcription not only results in production of an RNA molecule but also transcription itself can have profound consequences for the genome. One such example is transcription of non-protein-coding transcriptional units where the RNA may not necessarily be of major importance. This session will cover different aspects of transcription regulation and transcription output, and its effect on RNA production and the chromatin environment in a very diverse set of organisms.
Mitochondria and signalling
07/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Agnieszka Chacinska Agnieszka Chacinska (PL)
Warsaw
 Bettina Warscheid  Bettina Warscheid (DE)
Freiburg
Mitochondria perform many important metabolic functions. However, they are not separate entities and are well integrated in the cell and react to various cellular events through plasticity in shape and protein content. Pathology-linked mitochondrial defects are compensated by adaptive, regulatory and quality-control responses that drive changes in the cellular behavior.
Signal transduction
07/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Agnieszka Dobrzyn Agnieszka Dobrzyn (PL)
Warsaw
Christian Wolfrum Christian Wolfrum (CH)
Zurich
The symposium will highlight recent advances in mechanisms of metabolic control of cellular functions and whole body physiology. Transcriptional control of white and brown adipose tissue development, bioactive nutrient derived components regulating cellular processes and function, influence of adipose tissue development and function on the development of type 2 diabetes, neuroimmune mechanisms underlying obesity are among topics that will be discussed.
DNA architecture
07/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Igor Konieczny Igor Konieczny (PL)
Gdansk
Tomasz Zemojtel Tomasz Zemojtel (DE)
Berlin
The constant development of technology allows us to collect new data on genome architecture in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells. It is especially interesting how DNA replication, repair, modification and chromosome dynamics affect genome organization and functioning. This symposium will attempt to show examples of state of the art research exploring bacterial and human genomes. The current imaging technologies, new sequencing methods and biochemical approaches allowing DNA architecture analysis will be presented.
DNA editing and modification
08/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Iwona Fijalkowska Iwona Fijalkowska (PL)
Warsaw
 Ryszard Slomski  Ryszard Slomski (PL)
Poznan
The mechanisms by which cells produce or try to avoid mutations are of significant research interest. Understanding all mechanisms and finding new factors that are responsible for accurate DNA replication, efficient repair, and coordinated cell cycle progression has become a major challenge of current molecular biology. This knowledge should help us to understand the process of evolution, the genesis of cancer, genetic disorders or aging.
Single cell analysis and imaging
08/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Joanna Szczepanowska Joanna Szczepanowska (PL)
Warsaw
Alberto Luini Alberto Luini (IT)
Naples
Imaging techniques are essential for investigation of living systems at the molecular, the cellular and the physiological level from single cells through model organisms to humans. This session will try to show how imaging techniques can contribute to understanding of the cell biology and dynamics of various cellular processes.
RNA transport and translation
08/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Marek Tchorzewski Marek Tchorzewski (PL)
Lublin
Marina Rodnina Marina Rodnina (DE)
Göttingen
Translational machinery is a paragon of biological complexity and dynamics. It converts genetic information into functional proteins, determining the composition and the quality of the cellular proteome. Recent developments in understanding the structure and function of the ribosome as a central element of the translational machinery revealed that it is a hub for numerous regulatory circuits that can change the pace of translation, re-code the mRNA or even alleviate the co-linearity of mRNA and protein sequences. The session will provide insights into recent advances on the regulatory aspects of the translational machinery.
Sulfur metabolism and cellular regulation 
08/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Maria Wrobel Maria Wrobel (PL)
Krakow
Csaba Szabo Csaba Szabo (US)
Galveston
There is growing evidence that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in many physiological processes in mammalian tissues. H2S exerts a variety of beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system. Several disease states affecting the heart and blood vessels are associated with reduced H2S levels. Pharmacologically replenishing H2S using donor compounds has the potential to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction, improve the outcome of ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibit atherosclerosis. Mitochondria have become a promising therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of various illnesses. The session will outline the mechanisms of H2S signaling, which involves multiple pathways, and will also cover the biological roles of polysulfides (a related group of biological species with chemical and biological profile that is distinct from H2S). Strategies for sulfide replacement therapies - for diseases with H2S deficiency - will be discussed, including molecules that selectively deliver H2S to mitochondria.
Calcium and ROS signalling
08/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Shey-Shing Sheu Shey-Shing Sheu (US)
Philadelphia
Mitochondria play a central role in numerous fundamental cellular processes ranging from ATP production, Ca2+ homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptosis. Disturbances in mitochondrial ATP, Ca2+ and ROS dynamics lead to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases including heart failure, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and aging. The symposium will highlight recent advances in the functional significances of the communication between plasma membrane ion channels/receptors and mitochondrial Ca2+, ROS and bioenergetics.
RNA turnover
08/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Andrzej Dziembowski Andrzej Dziembowski (PL)
Warsaw
Dominique Gagliardi Dominique Gagliardi (FR)
Strasbourg
The expression of genetic information in eukaryotes is a very complex process regulated at multiple levels from chromatin structure and transcription initiation, elongation, and termination to pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export and decay. The session will highlight recent advances in our understanding of post-transcriptional gene expression regulatory mechanism, focusing on RNA turnover.
Rare diseases
08/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Grzegorz Wegrzyn Grzegorz Wegrzyn (PL)
Gdansk
Shunji Tomatsu Shunji Tomatsu (US)
Willmington
The session is devoted to rare diseases. This group of disorders consists of diseases with a prevalence lower than 1 per 2,000. However, although only a relatively small number of patients suffer from each such disease, there are over 7,000 rare diseases, which makes the number of affected persons large. Moreover, the vast majority of rare diseases are severe, with high morbidity and mortality, and no treatment available. The problems of rare diseases, their diagnosis, management and possible development of therapeutic options will be discussed during this session.
Cytoskeleton and molecular mechanisms of motility
08/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Joanna Moraczewska Joanna Moraczewska (PL)
Bydgoszcz
Folma Buss Folma Buss (UK)
Cambridge
Microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments form the cytoskeleton, which is a complex network of dynamic filaments present in each eukaryotic cell. The cytoskeleton together with the dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors and a vast array of regulatory proteins maintain the shape of the cell and are responsible for cell movement, division, intracellular transport, contraction, signaling and gene expression. This session will highlight recent discoveries that provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that control the multiple functions of the cytoskeleton.
Molecular neurobiology
08/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Leszek Kaczmarek Leszek Kaczmarek (PL)
Warsaw
Peter Kalivas Peter Kalivas (US)
Charleston
The session will cover the latest achievements of molecular neurobiology in understanding synaptic plasticity, especially in addiction, which is one of the most socially and clinically harmful human mental conditions. Since addiction can be appropriately modelled in laboratory animals, this research field leads the way to understand the diseased mind. In pursuing the brain -mind connection, there is a growing appreciation for the role of local modifications of neuronal circuitry in a form of strengthening and weakening of the synaptic connections, the process named by Jerzy Konorski from the Nencki institute, Warsaw, Poland as plasticity (Konorski, 1948). Nowadays, the progress in this area is largely driven by molecular and imaging technology developments.
Synthetic biopolymers for biomedicine
09/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Barbara Nawrot Barbara Nawrot (PL)
Lodz
Peter H. Seeberger Peter H. Seeberger (DE)
Potsdam
The construction of synthetic biopolymers with desired functionalities and biological/physicochemical properties delivers new tools for biomedicine and material sciences. The session will focus on the recently developed synthetic analogs of three of the most important biopolymers: nucleic acids, peptides and oligosaccharides. Thus, we will learn about new analogs of oligonucleotides (for antisense therapy, diagnostics, and nanotechnology applications), modern peptide probes based on natural and a wide range of unnatural amino acids (used for discovery of highly active and selective substrates and inhibitors for multiple proteases), as well as synthetic, biologically important oligosaccharides, which work surprisingly well as e.g. carbohydrate-based vaccines.
Signalling in brain cancer
09/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Bozena Kaminska Bozena Kaminska (PL)
Warsaw
Joan Seoane Joan Seoane (ES)
Barcelona
Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumours associated with significant morbidity and are highly resistant to current therapies. Advances in genomics and epigenomics have provided exceptional insights into the molecular diversity of these diseases and have revealed key genes and signalling pathways that drive tumour growth, and change its microenvironment. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity arise among cancer cells creating a small subpopulation of cancer cells with tumor-initiating capability as well as among stromal cells consisting of activated astrocytes, endothelial cells and infiltrating immune cells. All components of the tumour niche communicate with the tumour and each other and complex signalling networks are being unravelled. In this session, Joan Seoane will describe factors and molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer initiating cells/cancer stem cells maintenance and resistance to therapy, Bozena Kaminska will focus on molecular mechanisms underlying glioma-brain-macrophage communication and a role of integrin signalling in malignant gliomas, and Benjamin Deenen will discuss molecular characterisation of astrocytic subpopulations in glioma and their role in tumour invasion.
Induced pluripotent cells
09/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Jozef Dulak Jozef Dulak (PL)
Krakow
 Malin Parmar  Malin Parmar (SE)
Lund
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer the promise for development of biologically and medically justified regenerative therapies, based on the real capacity of iPSCs to differentiate to numerous cells types. Moreover, these cells are invaluable tools for personalized medicine, extending the possibilities for investigating the disease mechanisms and drug research. This session will overview the current knowledge and applications of iPSCs from the scientific and medical perspectives.
Integrative approaches to structural and synthetic biology 
09/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Long noncoding RNA
09/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Marek Figlerowicz Marek Figlerowicz (PL)
Poznan
 Thomas B. Hansen  Thomas B. Hansen (DK)
Aarhus
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a diverse class of molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression. The functional capabilities oflncRNAsrange from epigenetic remodelers in the nucleus to translational regulators in the cytoplasm. Tens of thousandslncRNAshave been identified in humans, but only a small fraction has been studied in detail. This session will cover the latest developments inlncRNA-mediated regulation of gene expression in health and disease.
Neurodegeneration
09/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Jacek Kuznicki Jacek Kuznicki (PL)
Warsaw
Oliver Bandmann Oliver Bandmann (UK)
Sheffield
The symposium will highlight recent advances in understanding intracellular signaling in normal neural cell functioning and its perturbations in Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Specifically, dysfunctions of ER -mitochondria tethering and perturbation in canonical Wnt signaling in some neurodegenerative diseases, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease, will be discussed.
Cell therapy and regeneration medicine
09/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Leonora Buzanska Leonora Buzanska (PL)
Warsaw
Angelo Vescovi Angelo Vescovi (IT)
Milan
This session will portray some of the most relevant applications for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. The recent advancesin stem cell technology, gene therapy and bioengineering are unraveling a series of cellular and molecular mechanisms through which transplanted cells may elicit their putative therapeutic activities. This has now led to the development of clinical grade cell drug products that have been tested in diverse clinical trials. These lectures will provide an overview of the application of different cell therapies, from experimental to clinical stages, while describing some of the future prospects in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system and of epithelial degenerative disorders.
Small noncoding RNA
09/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Zofia Szweykowska-Kulinska Zofia Szweykowska-Kulinska (PL)
Poznan
Witek Filipowicz Witek Filipowicz (CH)
Basel
One of the most remarkable discoveries of the last two decades was the identification of thousands of small 20- to 30-nt-long RNAs (sRNAs), such as microRNAs, piRNAs, and siRNAs, which silence gene expression in eukaryotes either at the level of transcription or post-transcriptionally. Mechanistic details of biogenesis and function of sRNAs are being revealed, often pointing to very complex protein or ribonucleoprotein machineries involved. In some organisms, sRNAs are part of the host immunity against viruses and other pathogens and such defense may entail inter-cellular or even cross-kingdom trafficking of sRNAs.
RNA in pathogenesis and therapy
10/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
David Corey David Corey (US)
Dallas
Synthetic oligonucleotides have the potential to recognize cellular RNA and control gene translation or splicing. Antisense oligonucleotides and duplex RNAs are a promising therapeutic platform for developing novel drugs and several compounds have had success in the clinic treating diseases with substantial unmet need. This symposium will introduce recent advances in basic science and drug development.
Plant biotechnology
10/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Ewa Lojkowska Ewa Lojkowska (PL)
Gdansk
Frederic Bourgaud Frederic Bourgaud (FR)
Nancy
Plants are organisms living in a wide range of environments in which they are continuously exposed to abiotic and biotic stress and their survival is dependent on the fast reaction to critical environmental factors. In addition, plants have developed a highly sophisticated defense system and produce a wide spectrum of a biologically active compounds. Multiple adaptive strategies developed by plants make them a source of inspiration for many applications ranging from production of pharmaceutics through therapeutic treatments to biocontrol solution in agriculture.
Proteins: Structure, disorder and dynamics
10/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Mariusz Jaskolski Mariusz Jaskolski (PL)
Poznan
Manfred Weiss Manfred Weiss (DE)
Berlin
The session will feature recent results and views concerning all structural and dynamical aspects of the protein world, showcasing proteins that are highly dynamic and even intrinsically disordered. Protein structure and dynamics as well as folding and misfolding will be discussed from the perspective of fundamental science as well as in the context of conformational pathologies. Experimental advancements, such as serial-synchrotron and -femtosecond X-ray crystallography, micro-ED, cryo-EM, and ultrafast spectroscopy will be highlighted in the invited talks.
Natural networks and systems
10/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Piotr Zielenkiewicz Piotr Zielenkiewicz (PL)
Warsaw
Matthias Heinemann Matthias Heinemann (NL)
Groningen
Systems biology deals with models and experiments at different levels of complexity of the systems analyzed as well as diverse spatial and temporal scales. This session is concentrated on the dynamics of processes occurring in single living cells and will cover current understanding of the cell’s metabolic control. The temporal scales analyzed will span orders of magnitude ranging from promoter and cell cycles to circadian clocks and evolution of metabolic networks.
Biochemistry, a success story
10/07/2019
10:00 – 11:00h
Janko Kos Janko Kos (SL)
Ljubljana
The session will present a relationship between structural features and function of proteins that could explain their importance for understanding cancer and AIDS. The examples will include peptidases, the enzymes that are crucial either for viral infectivity or for development and malignant progression of tumor cells. Structure-based design of new peptidase inhibitors provides new tools for specific impairment of harmful peptidase function enabling an improvement of existing modalities of treatment of cancer and AIDS.
Molecular biology of aging
10/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Ewa Sikora Ewa Sikora (PL)
Warsaw
 Oliver Bischof  Oliver Bischof (FR)
Paris
Ageing is a very complex biological process, which is strictly connected with age-related diseases. In the modern world the population of very old people is increasing and we have realized that successful intervention in the healthspan is possible. Cell senescence is considered to be at the root of organismal ageing. This symposium will deal with genetics, epigenetics and metabolism of senescent cells and will turn attention to the possibility of organismal rejuvenation via elimination of senescent cells.
Synthetic networks and systems
10/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Janusz Bujnicki Janusz Bujnicki (PL)
Warsaw
Danny Barash Danny Barash (IL)
Beer-Sheva
Our understanding of the structural, folding and catalytic properties of bio-macromolecules, in particular proteins and nucleic acids, has increased enormously in recent years. We are now able to predict the structure of many bio-macromolecules, given their sequence. The next step is to use this knowledge to design new molecules, with programmed sequences, which fold into desired structures and exhibit desired functions.
Multicomponent complexes
10/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Marcin Nowotny Marcin Nowotny (PL)
Warsaw
Krzysztof Liberek Krzysztof Liberek (PL)
Gdansk
Key cellular processes rely on complex multi-protein assemblies. Recent advances in biochemical and structural methods, for example in cryo-electron microscopy, allow us to gain detailed information about such assemblies and their mechanism of action. Prominent examples which will be presented in this session include complexes involved in proteostasis and maintenance of the genetic information.
Plant–environment interaction
10/07/2019
16:15 – 18:15h
Michal Jasinski Michal Jasinski (PL)
Poznan
Markus Geisler Markus Geisler (CH)
Fribourg
The sessile lifestyle has shaped the unique communication system of plants with their complex environment. A characterization of such communication systems is important for an understanding of factors determining the pathogenesis of microorganisms as well as immune responses and cell-to-cell signaling involved in the development, symbiosis and well being of the plant.
Genome editing (CRISPR)
11/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
 Krzysztof Chylinski  Krzysztof Chylinski (AT)
Vienna
CRISPR-based tools have revolutionized genome engineering due to their high activity and ease of use. Both basic science and application-based research highly profits from CRISPR technologies, which are commonly used to delete, introduce or mutate genes. Most important, CRISPR tools are highly flexible and also allow for gene regulation, targeted protein and nucleic acid modification or genetic screening. The already rich CRISPR toolbox is constantly expanding with novel systems alternative to commonly used Cas9 and new improved technologies, some of which will be discussed in this session.
Epigenetics and protein glycosylation
11/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Anna Litynska Anna Litynska (PL)
Krakow
Gordon Lauc Gordon Lauc (HR)
Zagreb
The majority of proteins are glycosylated and glycans are important contributors to molecular structure and function. Different glycans can be attached to the same glycosylation site, and functional consequences of alternative glycosylation are in many ways similar to effects of coding mutations in the corresponding gene. However, contrary to polypeptide parts that are defined by a direct genetic template and set for a lifetime of an individual, glycans are dynamic and their structure can be changed by simple changes of gene expression or intracellular organization. Nevertheless, despite the absence of a direct genetic template, glycome composition is highly heritable, indicating stable genetic and/or epigenetic regulation. Recent progress in analytical technologies enabled combined glycomic/genetic/epigenetic studies, which are now providing insight into complex regulation of glycosylation and its functional consequences.
Proteomic technologies
11/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Jerzy Silberring Jerzy Silberring (PL)
Krakow
Dominic M. Desiderio Dominic M. Desiderio (US)
Memphis
Researchers continuously develop novel and powerful proteomic technologies that are used to uncover vital molecular mechanisms that participate in various diseases, and to develop modern technologies that provide high-throughput, high-sensitivity, and high-selectivity analyses. In particular, more-specific approaches that focus on post-translational modifications (PTMs) are always needed. The session devoted to proteomic technologies offers a broad spectrum of information at the intersection among the important fields of clinical diagnosis, biomarker discovery, and analytical methods.
Bionanotechnology
11/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Jonathan Heddle Jonathan Heddle (PL)
Krakow
Bionanotechnology can be considered as a form of synthetic biology where natural or artificial nanoscale objects can be modified, designed and built using biological molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids as building blocks. We are increasingly able to manipulate these building blocks with high precision to allow us to construct useful structures and even complex nanomachines. This young discipline has many potential applications, from bespoke drug delivery systems to artificial cells and highly sensitive biosensors. Some of these aspects will be covered in this symposium.
Cell signaling in tumor biology
11/07/2019
09:00 – 11:00h
Marcin Majka Marcin Majka (PL)
Krakow
Veronika Sexl Veronika Sexl (AT)
Vienna
Signal transduction and its regulation plays a crucial role inphysiological and pathological processes. Understanding of the signaltransduction routes and their connections is of key importance fortumor biology and for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The session will deliver new informationand create the place to discuss recentdevelopments in tumor signal transduction.

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